20 of the most valuable South African stamps

My friend invited me over today to have a look at some of his most valuable South African stamp collection. Let me tell you, it was something truly special. Some of his stamps were worth over R100,000 EACH, and the history behind each one blew me away!

Apparently, they can range from anything between a few hundred rand to R1.2 million. Anyways, it’s safe to say I’m hooked. I decided to get on board and blog about my research. Which is why I’m sitting at my desk this second writing this.

First step, I decided to research 20 of the most valuable South African stamps that money can buy.

One thing worth mentioning, the first thing my friend told me is that just because stamps are valuable, it doesn’t mean they are rare. There are many factors that come into play that affects the price. I might research this and cover it in another article, so let me know in the comments below.

Based on my research, here are 20 of the most Valuable South African Stamps.

01. South West Africa 1973 SG245a Mint

  • Date printed: 1973
  • Recommended selling price: R2636

02. South Africa 1930 SGO15 var Official

  • Date printed: 1930
  • Recommended selling price: R4236

03. South Africa 1913-24 SG7w Mint

  • Date printed: 1913-1924
  • Recommended selling price: R10,356

04. South Africa 1908 SGZ68 Cancel

  • Date printed: 1908
  • Recommended selling price: R16,946

05. South Africa 1912 SG4 Proof

  • Date printed: 1912
  • Recommended selling price: R28,000

06.  1925 SG29var Mint

  • Date printed: 1925
  • Recommended selling price: R56,480

07. Unmounted 1942 Aden-Seiyun

  • Date printed: 1942
  • Recommended selling price: R30,000

08. 1863 Cape of Good Hope 1/- De La Rue Triangle

  • Date printed: 1863
  • Recommended selling price: R60,000

09. 1913 Double Head Perf 14

  • Date printed: 1913
  • Recommended selling price: R90,000

10. 1931 South West Africa Pictorials Imperfect Proofs

  • Date printed: 1931
  • Recommended selling price: R120,000

11. Natal Stamp

  • Date printer: 1902
  • Recommended selling price: R120,000

12. 3c Verwoord Commemoration

  • Date printer: 1966
  • Recommended selling price: R120,000

13. Cape of Good Hope Overprint 2 1/2 pence ZAR

  • Date printer: 1899
  • Recommended selling price: R128,000

14. Cape of Good Hope Overprint MAFEKING

  • Date printer: 1900
  • Recommended selling price: R185,000

15. Inverted Frame Union Parliament

  • Date printer: 1910
  • Recommended selling price: R285,000

16. Center Inverted Union Parliament

  • Date printer: 1910
  • Recommended selling price: R355,000

17. Missing Double Frame Springbok

  • Date printer: 1927
  • Recommended selling price: R426,000

18. Inverted Table Mountain

  • Date printer: 1927
  • Recommended selling price: R498,000

19. Cape of Good Hope

  • Date printer: 1855
  • Recommended selling price: R710,000

20.  MOST VALUABLEUnion King’s Head 5/-inverted Watermark

  • Date printed: 1913
  • Recommended selling price: R1 200 000

Are stamps a good investment?

There are two types of stamps. Collectible stamps that are collected by people interested in philately, and investment grade stamps that are bought by investors.

What’s the difference between the two? Collectible stamps aren’t bought as an investment, even though they may appreciate, they are purely bought as a hobby.

Only a very small percentage of stamps actually increase in value over time. This is where the difference lies. The hobbyist doesn’t care; however, the investor will study and only invest in stamps that they believe are likely to increase in value.

So how do you know if a stamp will increase in value? Investors usually look at these 3 things when deciding if a stamp is worth investing in.

  1. The stamps must be extremely rare.
  2. They are in the best possible condition.
  3. Stamps that have mistakes on them offer an investment opportunity. The famous “Prussian Blue” is the perfect example. There are also some modern-day stamp mistakes that have turned out extremely profitable for investors. I guess printing errors make them rarer?!

Am I buying stamps as an investment?

The way I see it is I’ll be researching stamps as a hobby anyways, so I might as well buy the stamps that I think are going to increase in price.

In other words, I’ll be a Stamp Hobby investor! Is that a thing? Well it is now.

Where to buy stamps

Now that I’ve got my list, it’s time to find the most reputable company to buy from in South Africa. I don’t want to make the big mistake of buying fake stamps. There are a lot of places online such as bidorbuy and Gumtree however I would like to avoid this as much as possible.

East gate stamps and coins seems to be the most legit company in the country from what I’ve seen online. They’ve been going for 30 years with a solid reputation.

There are also several auctions that are held throughout South Africa. I’ve never been to one but apparently some of the more expensive stamps are sold through here. Visit philatelicfriends.co.za to find out about the latest stamp auctions. Who knows, I might see you at one of them! Just don’t steal my bid.

Where to sell stamps

Again, be careful. I’ve heard some bad stories of people getting robbed while trying to sell on Gumtree. If your stamp is cheap then Gumtree or BidorBuy might work, if it’s expensive definitely do an auction or go to a reputable company such as East gate stamps and coins.

Anything else you would like me to cover?

If you have any questions, please leave a comment below.

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